Is the MindValley Quest All Access Pass worth it? My verdict (2020)

If you’ve followed my blogs in the past, then it should be no surprise that I’m a frequent student on the Mindvalley platform, which might be the most unique learning platform on the internet because of the “one-of-a-kind” nature of many of their courses.

And one of the most common questions I get from interested readers is whether they should pay for an individual course (or “quest”), or whether they should just subscribe for the All-Access Pass.

So should you subscribe to the Mindvalley All-Access Pass?

There is no quick yes or no answer here, and it really depends on your overall interest in the selection of Mindvalley courses and how much you see yourself learning from them.

In this article I’ll share my thoughts on the cost value of the All-Access Pass and what you should consider before buying it for yourself.

Mindvalley – The Full Rundown (Everything You Need to Know)

To understand the full benefits of the All-Access Mindvalley Pass, let’s start off with a complete refresher on everything you need to know about Mindvalley: What it is, who it’s for, and what makes it so special.

What is Mindvalley?

In simplest terms, Mindvalley is an online learning platform.

They get professionals and acclaimed individuals from all around the world who are experts in their field of study or thought, and create video courses that students can consume over a period of time, allowing them to properly absorb and digest the teachings at the recommended pace.

Unlike Coursera and other learning platforms online, Mindvalley doesn’t have hundreds or thousands of courses, and that might seem like a drawback, but it’s not.

The reason why they have a limited number of courses is because so much production value goes into every single course.

I’ve experienced around a dozen “quests” by now, and I’d be lying if I said that they weren’t all at least slightly transformative.

In terms of investment and production, Mindvalley doesn’t hold back. You will never feel like you’ve been robbed.

What are the Mindvalley courses like?

Mindvalley’s got their system down to a science, and you might think that removes some of the authenticity of it, but that isn’t the case at all.

By systemizing the way they teach their courses, you get the same quality of education every single time, meaning there’s a kind of trusted Mindvalley “stamp of approval” on every course they dish out.

So let’s break down the typical Mindvalley course. When you sign up for a Mindvalley course, you can expect the following:

  • An online learning curriculum of one-on-one videos with the teacher
  • A time-gated learning experience, meaning you don’t get the entire package on the same day. Courses last anywhere from 30 to 45 days, meaning you can expect 30 to 45 individual videos, breaking up the main lessons into week-by-week experiences
  • Each video lasting anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes each, although they often contain lessons, ideas, exercises and practices that will keep you mentally occupied all day
  • Some courses come with exercise plans, worksheets, and extra audio sessions to keep you on top of your lessons throughout the course experience
  • The course can be accessed through most electronic devices, including PCs, tablets, laptops, and phones
  • Exclusive invitation to a community filled with other students who are taking the course simultaneously with you, allowing you to discuss and share your thoughts and learnings with people on the exact same journey

And of course, once you finish the 30-45-day course, you get to keep all the material indefinitely (or if you’re on the All-Access Pass, for as long as you’re subscribed).

This allows you to go back to the course whenever you need a refresher or as a motivational tool to keep you following the plan.

Who is Mindvalley for?

To sum this section up, Mindvalley is for you if:

  • You’ve experienced personal revelations telling you that you need more from your life
  • You want to be a bigger version of who you are, but you don’t really know where to start
  • You’re serious about creating real change in your life, and you’re ready to invest the time to do it
  • You’re tired of your excuses and reasons for not doing the things you want to do
  • You know you can be so much more than what you are, if you could just find the right help
  • You are happy enough with your life to care about growth, and unhappy enough with it to know you need growth
  • You want the best of the best to guide you and teach you, giving you the starter kit to really become a different and ideal version of yourself

Mindvalley is for everyone, but not everyone would love Mindvalley.

You learn a mix of practical and theoretical teachings from the courses on Mindvalley, because there’s a kind of general theme of wellness, spirituality, mindfulness, self-improvement, and heightened awareness.

Essentially, Mindvalley teaches things you wouldn’t normally learn in school, from people who have walked the talk for decades.

It doesn’t matter what you like, what you do, who you are; even with just about 40+ courses on Mindvalley, you are guaranteed to find at least a handful of them that would absolutely impact the way you think.

Mindvalley would benefit anyone willing to put in the time and commitment to sit down for a few minutes a day and listen and practice to their teacher’s daily lesson.

And while that might sound like an opportunity everyone would take advantage of, it simply isn’t true.

I’ve had tons of experiences where I recommended Mindvalley to a friend or colleague, and they came back to me a week later telling me that it wasn’t for them.

Mindvalley is the kind of thing that you will either absolutely love, or feel completely indifferent towards; there’s very little in between.

I would say that the main difference between someone who would respond positively to Mindvalley versus someone who wouldn’t is whether or not they are satisfied with where they are in life, and whether or not they have the hunger to make real and long-term changes.

Because here’s the truth:

Mindvalley isn’t easy. What’s easy is coming home after a long day and turning on Netflix to binge your favorite TV show, or scrolling through Twitter and Instagram all night.

Mindvalley requires active participation, and you can’t just “zone out” the way we so often do with most of our free time in this social media age.

So even if these lessons are packaged as simply and precisely as possible – there’s not going to be much fluff and wasted time in 10-20-minute videos – it still requires readers who truly want to commit to growth, because if you don’t want to grow, then you don’t really want to do Mindvalley. And not everyone is ready for that.

Mindvalley essentially puts your excuses to the test – cost aside, there’s no way you don’t have the time or resources to do it.

So are you ready to be serious with yourself, or not?

The Mindvalley All-Access Pass: Everything You Get

The Mindvalley All-Access Pass turns the Mindvalley learning experience into a subscription service, and if you’ve got the money to afford it, it’s really hard to rationalize turning it down. So let’s start with the cost.

Mindvalley requires two things from its students – your time and your money – and it barely requires any time at all.

But the cost can be an issue for some people – students and young adults without steady employment – so it’s something we need to talk about.

If you live paycheck to paycheck, then Mindvalley might not be one of the first things you want to spend your money on.

Individual courses on Mindvalley cost anywhere from $199 to $499, giving you the full course experience for that one-time payment.

For some people that might not be a big deal, but for others that can be a pretty hefty investment.

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But the Mindvalley All-Access Pass makes Mindvalley so much more accessible to people from all demographics.

The All-Access Pass is just $599 per year, which honestly sounds like they missed a zero considering the average $350 price of their courses.

This gives you almost complete and full access to the Mindvalley course library; not just for a month, but for an entire year.

If you break it down, that brings you to an average cost of $2 per day for access to every single course on the Mindvalley platform, and they even throw in free completion certificates for every course you pass (these certificates usually cost an extra $50, so if you did all 30+ available programs, you’d save about $1600).

Here’s what you get when you sign up for the All-Access Pass on Mindvalley:

1) Nearly full access to the complete library of existing Mindvalley courses, including:

  • Unlocking Transcendence by Jeffrey Allan
  • Hero. Genius. Legend. by Robin Sharma
  • The Psychology of Winning by Denis Waitley
  • Awaken the Species by Neale Donald Walsch
  • The Longevity Blueprint by Ben Greenfield
  • The Yoga Quest by Cecelia Sardeo
  • The Habit of Ferocity by Steven Kotler
  • The Mastery of Sleep by Michael Breus
  • Super Reading by Jim Kwik
  • Duality by Jeffrey Allan
  • Uncompromised Life by Marisa Peer
  • Feng Shui For Life by Marie Diamond
  • Conscious Uncoupling by Katherine Woodward Thomas
  • Money EQ by Ken Honda
  • The M Word by Emily Fletcher
  • The Quest for Personal Mastery by Dr. Srikumar Rao
  • Speak and Inspire by Lisa Nichols
  • Superbrain by Jim Kwik
  • Be Extraordinary by Vishen Lakhiani
  • Rapid Transformational Hypnotherapy for Abundance by Marisa Peer
  • Chakra Healing by Anodea Judith
  • Total Transformation by Christine Bullock
  • Conscious Parenting Mastery by Dr. Shefali Tsabary
  • Life Visioning Mastery by Michael Beckwith
  • Live By Your Own Rules by Kristina Mänd-Lakhiani

2) Full access to the Mindvalley programs coming out over the next few months, including:

  • 10x Fitness by Lorenzo Delano
  • Superhuman at Work by Vishen Lakhiani
  • Energies of Love by Donna Eden
  • Mastering Authentic Networking by Keith Ferrazi
  • The Power of Boldness by Naveen Jain
  • Becoming Stress Proof by Paul McKenna
  • Ultimate Leadership by Keith Ferrazi
  • The Alan Watts Quest by Alan Watts
  • Integral Theory by Ken Wilber
  • The Silva Ultramind System by Vishen Lakhiani

3) Free bonus completion certificates with every course you complete, as well as all the extras that come with every course – worksheets, lesson plans, extra audio files, and more

4) Continued access to all the private, invitation-only Facebook groups and Quest communities with your fellow students and the teachers for each course

5) For certain courses, the teachers sometimes offer free live coaching calls for all students enrolled in the course

6) A 10-day money-back guarantee allowing you to change your mind, pull out, and get all your money back within ten days

On top of all that, I have to point out that they also recently added the really nifty Mindvalley Life Assessment, which is a neat and quick 20-minute “life assessment” that shows you the areas in your life that need development, allowing you to pinpoint exactly which Mindvalley courses would benefit you most.

This means you don’t have to spend hours searching through every possible course just to find the best one; they help you find the handful of courses that would help you most.

Who Is the All-Access Pass For?

The All-Access Pass is a great way to binge nearly all of the content available on the site.

If you’re a hungry learner like me or enjoy being a part of multiple classes at once (or just plain indecisive), then the All-Access Pass is definitely what you should get.

Again, quests can go up to $399 each. That’s pretty standard for the online learning industry but doing two or more quests a week can be pretty steep.

With the $599/year All-Access pass, you can get access to nearly everything they have on the site and save $12,000 in the process.

Still not sure if you qualify as a “hungry learner”?

Here are some circumstances where an All-Access Pass would be the better choice:

  • You have a partner or a family and you want different courses, you can share it
  • You can’t decide between 2 perfect courses, so you just do this
  • You don’t know what you want right now and you want to sample everything
  • You don’t want to commit to one course so you want to poke around the others until you find the most suitable one
  • You’ve already tried the sample free course and you love the high production quality
  • You want to experience every single course on the site, so you can enroll in courses at the same time so that you do everything in a year if you want, and then never subscribe next year
  • You want a chill experience and want to try courses one at a time; you would end up experiencing around 10 courses in a year
  • You’re interested in holistic growth and want to supplement spiritual lessons with courses on physical improvement
  • You simply don’t want to pay $299 – $399 per course when you can save more with $599 a year

If you’re new to MindValley and want to sample the platform before committing to a yearly plan, I suggest looking into their free courses.

Mindvalley has a rotating list of free 60 to 90 minute classes every week from their top instructors.

Right now Jim Kwik has one on developing your memory and channeling your inner genius.

Free courses are also a great way to see how you respond to different teaching styles and certain instructors.

You’ll see the multiple classes they have lined up and can book your spot so you don’t miss your chance when it finally goes on air.

Is it Worth It? Final Take

Getting the All-Access pass is a no-brainer if you’re already a patron of the Mindvalley platform.

You get a lot of value for what you’re saving and you can continue on your self-study sessions with extended access to even more quests.

But for the average person who may not be a Mindvalley enthusiast? The answer is also yes, but only if you’re willing to learn and put in the time.

The All-Access pass comes down to $2 a day; a small price to pay for a lifetime of knowledge.

Even if you’re not a spirituality or a wellness enthusiast, Mindvalley’s extensive category has something for every type of learner. Some of my favorites include:

Body – This category delves into physiology, weight loss, exercise, and nutrition.
Performance – This category is all about habit formation and achieving optimal performance.
Work – This category is all about becoming a better leader, speaker, and team member.

The best part is you can subscribe, try it for 9 days, and if you don’t like it, you get all your money back with their 10-day money back guarantee.

There’s really no danger at all in just trying it.

If you’re still not sure if the All-Access Pass if the better choice for you, ask yourself the following questions:

  • How many courses do I take every week?
  • Do I want to share my account with family and friends?
  • Am I interested in one course only or in an entire category of courses?
  • Is one course enough to help me achieve a different perspective or understanding of life, my goals, and my career?
  • Do I have the time throughout the year to go through the courses at my own pace?
  • Do I want to pay $199 to $399 per course?
  • Am I interested in more than just one category of course?
  • Am I an avid learner looking to improve myself through different facets?

Personally, I can’t recommend it enough. The Pass offers tremendous value and you never feel like you’re settling for a cheaper All Access alternative.

There’s plenty to enjoy on the Mindvalley platform. I’ve been subscribed for two years and not once did I feel like I wasn’t getting what I paid for.

With new content introduced regularly, I’m only surprised that Mindvalley doesn’t charge more.

There’s definitely something for every kind of person, whether you’re a serious student like me or someone who wants to take a few classes every couple of months.

Written by Lachlan

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